Myths vs. Facts! The Truth About Landing a Job in Arts & Entertainment

Myths vs. Facts! Breaking down the common misconceptions, urban legends and false facts around landing a job in Arts & Entertainment.

Myth: All you need is talent.

Fact: Talent is only part of what gets you hired. As with any job, you also need to have a resume and other application materials that clearly convey your qualifications. It’s also important to be industry savvy.  The more you understand your industry and the more you network within it, the more effectively you’ll be able to position yourself to be hired!

 

Myth: If you want to work in the entertainment industry, you have to be an actor, writer, or director.

Fact: The entertainment industry has a wide range of employment opportunities beyond those jobs! Think about all the names that you see in the end credits of a movie or tv show, or in a playbill. There are a plethora of freelance and staff positions behind the scenes and throughout every aspect of the industry. You can learn about these by reading trade publications, conducting informational interviews, participating in industry networking events, and attending Wasserman panels such as  “What’s Next: Humanities.”

 

Myth: I’m a performer so I don’t need to do an internship. 

Fact: Internships can be a great way for you to get the inside scoop on what the industry wants. For instance, by interning with a casting office, you’ll see how hiring decisions are made, which can help you be smarter about how you present yourself at an audition.

 

Myth: All actors are waiters.

Fact: While the food service industry does offer a flexible schedule that gives actors the ability to also audition, there are a variety of “sustainable” jobs that an actor can have. This includes teaching artist, web designer, tour guide, concierge, IT support, graphic designer, personal organizer, real estate agent, and fitness trainer, just to name a few. A career counselor can help you identify your marketable skills and determine which sustainable jobs might be right for you.

 

Myth: If I don’t have an agent within six months after graduation, I’ll never get work.

Fact: Most early-career artists don’t have agents! In fact, it’s rare for students to obtain agents immediately after graduation. Agents prefer to see that artists have some experience outside of school – if the artist is able to obtain work on their own or is getting notice from competitions (e.g. the Nicholl Fellowship) or festivals (e.g. SXSW), that signals to the agent that the artist has enough talent to be marketable.

 

 

How Different Job Positions Prepare You: From Librarian to Volunteer to Museum Docent

Volunteer Combines Experience as a Librarian, Museum Docent

16:37 pm By JFriedman in From the Museum

For Candace Stuart, who has worked as a volunteer in the museum’s Docent program, her curiosity about 9/11 began right after that tragic day.

Working as a news librarian for ABC News at the time, she cites her research on the events of 9/11 as some of the most important of her career.

“The Docent program just puts it all together,” Stuart said.

Stuart, currently a librarian at New York University, was a member of the first class of museum docents in January of 2014 and became a volunteer when the museum first opened in May. She continued in the program throughout the year.

She says her library background and her work at the museum have complemented each other.

“They both involve teaching in a way, which I hadn’t experienced until I worked at NYU,” Stuart said.

Being involved in the Docent program has given Stuart the confidence to pass along the information she has learned through the program to museum visitors.

“It’s a great experience,” Stuart said. “You get to expand your knowledge of one of the most important events in this country’s history as well as improve skills in talking to people and groups.”

For Stuart, one of the most memorable moments as a docent came during the museum’s opening week. During that time, the museum was only open to survivors and family members of 9/11. Docents, who are normally encouraged to engage museum guests, were advised to let guests come to them.

“It was more listening then telling,” Stuart said. “It was a very moving experience talking to those who had first-hand knowledge and experience of what this museum is all about.”

In September, Stuart became an intern for the memorial museum’s exhibitions staff as part of her Digital Libraries certificate at Syracuse University. Stuart plans on soon returning to the museum as a docent on a regular basis.

To learn more about Museum Docent positions, click here. For information on volunteer positions with the museum, click here.

Also, be sure to stop by the 9/11 Memorial & Museum table at the upcoming Spring Job and Internship Fair on Thursday, January 29th at NYU Kimmel!

By Deena Farrell, 9/11 Memorial Communications Intern

Edited by NYU Wasserman

 

 

Career Tips to Beat the Winter Break Blues

Unless you’re that lucky NYU student who spends winter break traversing the streets of Paris, jet skiing in the Caribbean, or even staying busy with J-term, it may just be that time of year again.  The time of year where the initial Netflix binge begins to slow, meals from the holidays are finally finishing digestion, and all your friends from home start trickling back to their respective schools, leaving you wondering what in the world you should do with your life. I digress.  Fortunately, I’ve come to find that winter break can be the perfect time to ensure that you’re set for the coming months.  Whether you’re looking for a part-time job, a spring semester/summer internship, or even full-time employment, a few hours of work amid your slew of down time can do wonders. Below you’ll find a few tips to help spice up your professional development over winter break.

1.    Update your resume.

We’ve seen it before: you’ve spent hours adding to your resume, coming up with the perfect format, describing your amazing work and contributions to companies/overall society in just one page, and you’re feeling great about yourself… until you realize that was done over a year ago. A lot’s happened since then, so get to updating!

2.    Creating/updating your LinkedIn page.

For those of you who have yet to hop on the LinkedIn train, there’s no better time than now. Set up your profile and begin making connections.  If you already have a LinkedIn account but (ahem,) haven’t given it a glance in weeks, the time has come my friend.

3.    Get organized: Make Lists.

Organize lists of companies you’re interested in, what you’re looking to get out of employment, locations you’d like to explore, application deadlines, and other general attributes to your professional future.  Making lists can provide clarity, organize to your thoughts, and help you figure out what your next steps should be as you seek employment.

4.    Consider a personal website.

Across disciplines, students and authorities alike have been creating personal websites in order to market themselves professionally. Consider this option and look into some resources for finding ways to build a personal website. (There are both free and costly options out there. Spend some time on Google or speak to a Wasserman Career Coach for more information.)

5.     Network

Reach out to people in your network and express interest in getting more experience in your respective field. You never know how far a simple question or a “hello” can go!

6.    Meet with a Wasserman Career Coach

Whether it’s in person or remotely, winter break is a great time to meet with a career coach to talk in greater detail about your goals for the coming year. By planning ahead, and taking a few moments out of your break to spice up your professional life, you can be steps ahead in the game.

These are just a few tips to help you plan for the rest of the year. If you have any specific questions, feel free to meet with a Wasserman Career Coach. View the Wasserman website for more information on winter break walk-in hours and remote meetings for those outside of NYC. But most importantly, enjoy your winter break! I’m sure there’s something new on Netflix for you to get addicted to.

Once you return from break, make sure to attend our spring career fairs! Information is below:

Spring Job & Internship Fair

Thursday January 29, 2015 11am – 3pm | NYU Kimmel Center

Take advantage of this opportunity to meet with employers hiring for summer internships and full-time positions in various industries!

Engineering & Technology Fall Fair

Thursday, February 12, 2015 11am – 3pm | NYU Brooklyn Campus, Jacobs Gymnasium

NYU Students are invited to explore full-time, part-time, and internship opportunities in a variety of fields, including engineering, computer hardware/software, technology, science, management, and digital media.

Download employer information on The Career Fair Plus app, featuring: 

  • · Complete company listing
  • · Interactive Floor Plan
  • · Event Details
  • · Announcements for real-time updates
  • · Career Fair tips section to help you prepare

Search for the NYU Career Fair Plus app on Google Play or iTunes

terri (2).jpg 

Terri Burns is a junior studying computer science in CAS. This year, Terri is on the communications team with her fellow Peer in Careers. Outside of her work with Wasserman, Terri is a Resident Assistant in Carlyle Court, a Google Student Ambassador, and heavily involved with NYC’s largest student technology organization, Tech@NYU.

 

How to “Wow” Your Interviewer

Claudia Enriquez is a second year student receiving her Masters in Public Administration from NYU Wagner. She currently works as a Graduate Program Assistant at NYU Wasserman. She is a New Yorker at heart, growing up in Long Island, then moving to upstate New York to attend college, and now she’s back downstate and enjoying her time at NYU.

You landed the interview, now it’s time to bring out your A game and really ‘wow’ your interviewer. Follow these simple steps below and prepare to land that dream job/internship!

Research, Research, Research

Did I mention research? Check out the company’s website. Review the company’s mission statement, values, culture, goals, achievements, recent events, and the company’s products/services.  If you know anyone who works there – ask him/her to give you the inside scoop!

Practice Makes Perfect…Or at least Preparation!

Be prepared to the job interview. Practice general and challenging interview questions with your peers.  Practice in front of a mirror – don’t be shy! The more prepared you are, the more confident you’ll feel, which will come off during the interview.  While you should practice, be authentic during the actual interview.

NYU Wasserman has plenty of great career resources.  Swing by during walk-in hours for a mini mock interview, or make an appointment with a career counselor. You can find other helpful resources on CareerNet, under the Career Resources tab. Check it out!

Get Ready and Be on Time

The night before do the following:

  • Have your outfit picked out (rule of thumb: dress one or two levels up)

  • Pack your bag

  • Print out extra copies of your resume

  • Get directions to your destination (Check alternative routes)

  • Relax and have a good night’s sleep

The day of the big interview give yourself enough time to arrive. Arrive between 5-7 minutes early. If you’re too early walk around, grab some water, etc. As soon as you walk through the door, all eyes are on you – that means, be polite to everyone, from the receptionist to the person interviewing you.  Remember to put on your best smile!

How to Answer Questions During the Interview?

During the interview make eye contact and answer questions with confidence.  Use the STAR method:

  • Situation – Describe the situation you were in (e.g., the name of the internship or course you were taking)

  • Task – Identify the specific project you were working on and briefly discuss what it entailed

  • Action – This is the most important element! Specifically identify what YOUR action was related to the question that was asked

  • Result – Close the question by stating an outcome to your situation

If you ever find yourself stuck on a question, that’s okay! Say to the interviewer ‘that’s a good question, let me think about it.’ Pause, breathe, think, and then give your answer.

Ask Meaningful Questions

At the close of the interview, the interviewer will always ask if you have any questions for them.  Have about 5-10 questions prepared, but of course, don’t ask questions already answered during the interview.

Below are good examples of what to ask the interviewer.

  1. What qualities do you think are most important for someone to excel in this position?

  2. What do you personally like most about working for this company?

  3. What would be one of the greatest challenges a person in this position would face?

  4. Can you tell me more about the team I’ll be working with?

  5. What are the next steps in the interview process?

Follow Up

Send a thank you email or a letter to your interviewer(s) 24-48 hours after the interview. If you interviewed with more than one person, send tailored individual thank you notes. Reiterate your strengths and your interest in the company. This is also an opportunity to add anything you did not discuss during the interview. As always, thank them for their time and the opportunity.

Good luck!

Employer Perspective: Is your College Major relevant to the Market?

Murshed Chowdhury acts as an advisor to both companies and individuals who are looking for assistance in technology talent acquisition and development. He has served as the CEO & Partner of Infusive Solutions Inc. since its establishment in 2001. Prior to Infusive, he worked at several recruiting agencies where he honed his skills and rose the ranks within the organization before founding his own company.

With over 15 years of technology placement experience, Murshed has helped secure some of the most competitive technical positions for his clients at some of the world’s most prestigious firms. He holds a Bachelors Degree in Political Science from Fordham University.

Here he shares his insight into how to pick a major that you enjoy and that matches the market demand:

It is important when you’re in college not to just pick a major but the right major, one that will have viable job opportunities when you graduate. Too often, students invest years of their lives, hundreds of thousands of dollars and mount large student debt just to come to terms with the fact that the job market is not very favorable for what they received their degree in. This is a harsh reality lesson to learn but one many graduates face. With a slow recovering economy the outlook can be even more grim and extremely stressful.

I believe that college students need to invest time in following their dreams but to offset that with the realities of the market. Recently, I came across a recent college grad who was bussing tables to make ends meet. He just graduated with a degree in English Literature from a good university. He said his dream was to be a writer. Now, if someone had advised him to augment his degree with a minor in Business Administration or Marketing, he could have landed a job writing for a company blog, or an editor for a media publication company etc. Since he was never advised as such, he had to take whatever he could to make a living.

The key is to make sure that you major in something you enjoy but to be cognizant of what that means down the road when you join the job market. An understanding of majors with the best trajectories for job security, income and the correlation between the two may shed some light on what I am talking about. The chart below is divided into 4 quadrants that describe the various levels of income potential and job security.

Each of the four quadrants above identifies each job with the two critical criteria that are important for anyone looking at the market, especially a new college grad, on how to choose their next position. Income indicates earning potential and is pretty straight forward. Security represents the amount of available jobs for that particular major which correlate to the various employment levels for those defined majors. Basically, the lower the unemployment rate, the greater the security the position affords.

According to a study by the Center on Education and the Workforce at Georgetown University, “majors that are most closely aligned with particular industries and occupations tend to have low unemployment rates but not necessarily the highest earnings. Some majors offer both high security and high earnings, while other majors trade off earnings for job security. Healthcare, Science and Business majors have both low unemployment and the highest earnings boost from experience and graduate education. At the same time, Education, Psychology and Social Work majors have relatively low unemployment, but earnings are also low and only improve marginally with experience and graduate education.” In other words, you can choose a major that has good earnings potential and a high degree of job security. You can also find yourself choosing a major that has a high degree of job security, but low relative lifetime earnings potential. Or, you may find yourself drawn to a major that leads to relatively higher unemployment and low wages. As you choose your major, you want to know what most likely awaits you in your future career, and determine your college options and lifestyle accordingly.

Obviously, the most ideal quadrant is the one that has high income and high job security. Basically, for those majoring in Computer Science, Business Administration or Healthcare for example, have the potential to not only land a well-paid job, but they also know that due to a high demand for their positions, it will translate to low unemployment rates. You lose a job in this category; you should have a quick turnaround finding a new one. What can also be inferred from this is the ability to switch jobs for whatever reason is also much easier for those who fall in this quadrant.

The second quadrant we will look at represents those who may not have a high income potential but there is a great level of security for those positions. You may earn less than those in other majors but there is a good demand for your role. You can be gainfully employed whether you’re looking for your first job or interested in changing positions. Those in education are a great example of people who would likely fall into this category. You may not break the bank as an educator but there is a strong demand for teachers so you can look forward to steady employment.

The third quadrant we will look at represents those who have the ability to garnish high earnings but the tradeoff is that it comes with low job security. Finance, Legal and Sales professionals, and to a certain degree, entrepreneurs, fall into this category. Especially, entrepreneurs in their nascent stages. The rewards can be high but stability is low. Everything is dependent upon production; it’s the, “more you kill, the more you eat” mentality. These great rewards come with greater risks. Unless you maintain consistent levels of production, you can find yourself out of a job pretty quickly.

Finally, we will look at what many will consider the least sought after quadrant. These positions are the ones where the ability to earn a decent living is low and the ability to find a job once you lose it very tough. Anthropology or English Literature, as our examples above show, can fall into this area. There just isn’t a great demand for those skill sets which leads to decreasing earning potential and a limit in the amount of available jobs. It is a very tough outlook for those majors.  The key here, for those who fall in this category more so than the others, is to have them augment their degrees with more relevant minors/dual majors or develop  a new skill keeping the job market in mind.

Now, let me be clear, I am a big believer of following your passion, but that does not mean you ignore the realities on the ground. The greatest lesson an entrepreneur learns from the market, is whether their product or service is something someone will pay for. The show Shark Tank covers this in almost all of their episodes. Would-be entrepreneurs are in love with their product or service, but the judges always breathe some reality into them when they tell them, if the sales aren’t there, it’s probably not a great product or service at that point. The market is the ultimate arbitrator. The same goes with colleges and their majors. You may love what you study, but life is different when college ends and you have to face the reality of finding a job, making a living, dealing with mounting student and credit card debt. Again, the market is the ultimate arbitrator. That being said, you can continue learning what excites you, but invest some time in what the market values, and you will avoid the challenges many face post degree.

The solution starts with awareness. Research your major and it’s potential for a job, whether that’s a one year or four years from now. It’s never too late. Just because you’re a senior, it’s not the end of the world but if you can get into that mindset as a freshman, all the better. For many of you who aren’t even sure what you want to do, this could be the reality check you needed to help you decide where to invest the next few years of your life. Take it from someone who knows this reality all too well. I wish someone had told me about this when I was in college a while back. I graduated with a degree in Political Science from Fordham University and decided not to go to law school or apply for Foreign Service. This left me with few options. It’s no surprise that my first job out of college had nothing to do with my major.

Also, speak to your career services center. They can help you understand what’s trending on the market, connect you to alumni or industry experts, offer workshops, inform you about upcoming fairs where you can get a great gauge of what is hot in the job market. In my opinion, the best time to engage the career services center is in your freshmen year, and then your sophomore year, and then your junior year and senior. You get my point. They are there to help, so leverage their capabilities to help you.

Ironically, the greatest lesson the market can teach you, is that you may end up doing something you didn’t want to, simply because you only wanted to learn what is that you wanted to.

3rd Annual School of Professional Studies Networking Night

Networking Night 2014

On November 7, 2014, the NYU Wasserman Career Center, NYU SHRM Chapter, and NYU Integrated Marketing Association jointly hosted the Third Annual School of Professional Studies Networking Night. Over 100 NYU School of Professional Studies graduate students and 23 employers attended the event. It was a great opportunity for students to network with industry professionals and gain insights into these industries.

The event began by giving students time to develop their pitches, and then allowed for two 30 minute roundtable discussions with industry professionals.  Students practiced and received feedback on their pitches during these roundtables, and the event concluded with an open networking session. For a list of Employers that participated in the event, please click link…

As a first-time participant and volunteer, I enjoyed the event very much and learned a tremendous amount from the industry professionals. I am grateful that they took time out of their busy schedules to engage with students, answer questions, provide resume/interview tips, and offer opportunities to connect with them. It was inspiring to see some of these people were former M.S. HRMD program graduates, and hear them talk about how this degree enhanced their careers. I strongly recommend more students attend the event next year and prepare a great pitch.

The Quick Tips for Perfecting Your Pitch shared invaluable tips with the students:

The purpose of having a pitch during networking activities is to raise awareness of “your personal brand” in order to build authentic relationships with professionals and to share your abilities, skills and background.

Your professional pitch should…

  • Communicate your personal brand
  • Covey your unique selling point (USP)
  • Answer the questions “Tell me about yourself?” “What do you do?” and “What are you interested in doing next?”

To create your pitch, focus on…

  • Using the STAR method (Situation, Task, Action, Result) to tell stories, rather than just telling facts
  • Tailoring your pitch for the audience and setting
  • Making it conversational; think of open-ended questions to ask the employer or contact 

Keep in mind these “Golden Rules”…

  • Be an authentic and genuine individual
  • Become your own subject matter expert
  • Personalize, prepare, and practice your pitch

Don’t miss out on our upcoming webinar, “Networking Over the Holidays” on Wednesday, Dec. 3rd at 12:00pm. RSVP here!

Employer Insight: 5 Things to Expect at a Startup

 

Susan Zheng is the co-founder and CEO of Lynxsy, a mobile recruitment marketplace for companies to hire junior, non-technical talent. Previously, she was an early employee at Tough Mudder where she helped the company grow from 10 to 200 in two years. She graduated from NYU Stern with a degree in Finance and International Business.

Career advice: Take chances, and don’t worry if your career doesn’t follow a formula. The most successful people in history have had non-linear careers.

5 Things to Expect at a Startup

As a soon-to-be or recent grad, you’re chomping at the bit to jump into the workforce. You’ve got a stellar resume and awesome references, but where to begin?

You could take the typical route of college grads and pound the pavement in pursuit of a corporate gig. But maybe you’re looking for a little more excitement and a little less routine, a company that veers off the beaten path and forges its own trail. If you want to be a part of something from the ground up, a startup could be just the place to launch your career.

What exactly will it mean to work at a new uncharted business? Before you fire off your resume, you should know a little bit about what you’re getting into. Here’s a list of five things you can expect—and look forward to—if you work at a startup:

1) Be Ready to Wear Many Hats

When your team is small, as it inevitably will be in the beginning, you’ll likely be assigned tasks not directly in your line of duty. One moment you might be doing competitor research, the next you might be negotiating vendor agreements and the next you could be ordering toilet paper for the office. In your daily grind, you’ll undoubtedly get to dig into projects that would be out of reach in a typical entry-level position.

2)  Change Is the Only Constant

In the world of startups, change is the only constant—so you’d better be flexible. The company could decide to pivot in a new direction. Or employee growth could make you go from the sole business development associate to the head of sales in a matter of weeks. It might be as simple as changing priorities from mid-morning to the afternoon. If it pains you to switch gears all day long, or you’re on the retentive side when it comes to your to-do list, then steer clear. But if you’re game for variety, you’ve got the startup mentality.

3) 100% Mindshare

You won’t be punching a clock the same way you would at an established company.  Startups have a smaller window to get results, which may mean logging extra hours to ramp up the business. Your contributions won’t be confined to the office—if you even have one— and your schedule will probably include late-night brainstorming sessions over pizza. More than your hours, your passion and productivity will be key. You should expect to have 100% mindshare, which may involve eating, breathing and sleeping with the wellbeing of the company on your mind.

4) The Payoff

You shouldn’t join a startup solely on the off chance it could be the next big social network. Join one because you want to roll up your sleeves and be involved in the thrilling nitty-gritty of growing a business. You can make an average entry-level salary ($35K-$45K) and have the opportunity to earn a small equity share in the business. Not all startups will enjoy outrageous success, but those that excel tend to generously reward the individuals who have invested their time and talents to grow the business. Financial compensation aside, you are getting the chance to be involved in something awesome, so enjoy the journey.

5) Unlimited Potential

Career trajectory at a startup isn’t linear. There may be no distinct corporate ladder to climb, but there’s the potential for a big upside if you’re smart, motivated and committed. You could start in customer service and be promoted to managing the entire 20 person customer service team in 3 months. Once you prove yourself, you’ll rise in the organization and gain valuable skills and experience.  If the company takes off, you’ll be invited along for the ride.

Sound exciting and worth a gander? Go for it—make the bold move and explore opportunities with a startup today. If you don’t know where to begin, start your search with Lynxsy.

Would you like to meet  Susan Zheng, co-founder and CEO of Lynxsy? Attend the What’s Next Entrepreneurship Career Panel – Wednesday, Nov. 5th at 5:30pm. RSVP here!

What Does a Perfect Storm and The Best Job for the Future Have in Common?

Earlier this year, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics published their Top Ten List of Best Jobs for the Future.  Ranking #2 on the list was financial advisor with a projected 10-year growth rate of 27%–almost 3 times the job growth rate of all occupations.

So, why is financial advisor ranked so high?  Well, it’s actually a perfect storm of demographics, institutional change and consumer need.  First, the average age of a financial advisor in the industry today is 57 so if you fast-forward 10 years with retirements, practice mergers & acquisitions and death, the gap needed to fill all these vacancies is over 237,000.

Also people are living longer – the life expectancy of someone in the U.S. is 79 years old.  Now compare that to the life expectancy of someone who lived in 1900 – only 43.  So with medical advances and standard of living improvements people now get two lives when they used to get one!  Or, to view it another way, according to the US Census, the number of Americans aged 65 and older is projected to double by 2050.

The second part of this perfect storm is institutional change.  Back in the day, retirement savings was essentially taken care of from your company, government, and/or union.  Things are different now and Gen Y knows that all the ‘heavy lifting’ for living a comfortable lifestyle in retirement rests on their shoulders – there are no defined benefit plans and Social Security will run dry. And depending on how you look at it, living longer could have its drawbacks if there was not a disciplined approach to retirement planning.  The reality is ‘retirement’, how anyone defines it, can last 30+ years.

Finally, consumer need for sound financial advice from a professional has become more prevalent than ever before.  The multitude of choices, product complexities, lack of time for ‘doing-it-yourself’, and recent market crashes like that of 2008 brings great demand for help.  Consumers want to sit down with someone who can educate them on what’s out there to take care of their needs so they can make smarter financial decisions.  And according to a recent report by LIMRA, 78% of Americans surveyed aged 25-44 do not have a financial advisor.

So, this perfect storm does have a happy ending – a great opportunity for someone who is entrepreneurial, ambitious and passionate about starting their own financial advisory practice and truly helping people with their long-term plans.  The market opportunity is there and the career prospects are ripe – it’s rewarding, it’s challenging, it’s exciting and it’s needed.

At Empire Wealth Strategies we have a unique platform to help someone transform their start-up to a successful and purposeful financial advisory practice.  Check us out if you want to learn more.

Are you interested in working for Empire Wealth Strategies? Attend the Empire Wealth Strategies Recruiter-in-Residence on Thursday, Nov. 13th. RSVP here!

4 Golden Rules to Rocking Your Virtual Internship

By Janel Abrahami

Janel Abrahami is a May 2014 graduate of NYU Steinhardt’s Applied Psychology program. She currently serves the NBCUniversal intern population as a Campus 2 Career Assistant and a catalyst for early career development.You can find her talking about all things work on Twitter and LinkedIn

Looking for a flexible way to explore a new industry or pursue a passion while at school? Consider a virtual internship! Check out the NYU CareerNet job board for current openings.

From campus ambassador gigs, to web development co-ops, to editorial spots, virtual internships are as limitless as ever before. These unique positions allow young professionals to gain valuable experience in chosen fields while still maintaining some flexibility in their crazy schedules. They can even be great ways to extend summer internships into the fall semester by doing work remotely from campus!

However, with this flexibility may also come a lack of structure that could derail your progress working away from the office. Heed these golden rules to get the most out of your virtual internship- just add WiFi:

  1. Set clear goals from the beginning: The best way to determine how much progress you’ve made is to measure against a fixed goal. Have a conversation with your supervisor at the start of your internship about what she would like you to accomplish, as well as the company’s goals in general. Keep these handy to reference when working and be ready to…

  2. Schedule regular check-ins with your supervisor: Plan 30-minute calls or skype sessions every month or after each project to get feedback on what what’s working and what can be improved upon going forward. This is a great time to get valuable feedback from your boss, but it’s also a chance for you to be honest about your experience so far and make sure that you are getting the guidance and mentorship you need as well.

  3. Keep track of your deadlines: When school and extracurriculars are also competing for your commitment, it can be easy to lose track of an internship assignment- especially when your boss is not personally there to make sure you get it done. Keep a shared work calendar on Google Drive with your team; break assignments into smaller tasks; set reminders on your phone- however you stay organized and keep your deadlines in mind.

  4. Stay inspired!: A virtual internship should be an organic way to pursue your passion wherever you are. Keep up-to-date on news in your field, subscribe to trade journals, and network with other virtual interns to share ideas and find inspiration when you feel disengaged.

Have you held a virtual internship before? What advice would you add to this list?

Meet Our Guest Tweeters: Carley Clement and Natalie Ball, Manna Project International

On November 4th, Carley and Natalie will take over @NYUWassEmployer on Twitter and give you live updates about the projects they work on, meetings they attend, and the culture of the Manna Project International office.

Carley Clement

Carley Clement, New York University CAS '14 - Program Director at Manna Project International Ecuador

Carley is a New Yorker at heart, growing up in Rochester and moving to New York City to attend college. She studied at NYU where she majored in Spanish and Latin American Literatures and Cultures and completed a thesis on the presentation of Pope Francis in the Argentine press. After studying abroad in Buenos Aires and working for a summer at a non-profit in Medellín, Colombia, she was excited to get back to Latin America after graduation, and Manna seemed to be the perfect fit. In the future she hopes to continue to work on international development projects in Latin America and build bridges between the Latin America and the United States.

Career Advice: Collect new experiences and take risks in your career search; you never know what passions and hidden talents you’ll discover along the way

Natalie Ball

Natalie is from Chicago, Illinois and graduated from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing with a Bachelor of Science in Nursing and a minor in Multicultural/Global Health Studies. As a registered nurse, Natalie is very passionate about global health and is excited to partner with Manna Project’s community clinic to better improve health conditions. She enjoys teaching women’s health and staying active through her interest in soccer. Natalie developed her passion for social entrepreneurship while interning in Mexico City and participates in microfinance projects with women, especially through Manna’s jewelry cooperative. Natalie is very enthusiastic about a holistic approach to international development as it combines many of her passions and creates an opportunity to work alongside community members to help them realize long-term health and educational goals.